Saturday, December 5, 2009

Lost in Translation


This made me laugh. The French have adopted the English term, "brunch" but as far as I know, there's no meal called "slunch." Actually my favorite creative use of English by the French is "relooking" which means remodeling when applied to a building or makeover when applied to a person. Say that with your best Inspector Clouseau accent and I defy you not to laugh too.

16 comments:

Gabriel said...

haha...slunch? sounds interesting. what does the menu say?

Anne said...

For brunch: a hot beverage, orange juice, and toasted bread with butter and jam. (Hardly brunch but the French are not big eaters in the morning).

For slunch: the plate of the region -- sausage, duck breat, chicken (not sure what cansalade is) and salad plus a glass of wine.

Note: I took this outside Paris -- you'd pay a lot more in town.

Dan said...

Very odd. Is slunche between supper and lunch? In the spirit of the titles, maybe cansalade is candy salad? Canard salade? I have trouble reading French hand writing, but it looks like Je brunche, not Le brunche. That would make brunche a verb, wouldn't it?

Anne said...

Yes, Dan, you're right. It's "je" and using brunch and slunch as verbs. I like the idea of candy salade.

Imen McDonnell said...

I've been reading your blog and love the tone of it...really resfreshing. I am an American living in Ireland with a blog http://marriedanirishfarmer.com. Especially loved your post on Expats. So true. Thanks for sharing your experiences--Well done!

Starman said...

And what do they mean by 'flunch'? Have you been to one of those? There is one just across the street from the Pompidou on the corneer of rue Rambuteau and rue Beaubourg.

Belle de Ville said...

Slet's do slunch.
I'll have my people call your people.

Loving Annie said...

Good Sunday morning to you.
I'm from California, and am planning a trip to Paris and the chateau along the loire next May 2010...
Unfortunately the day I wanted to visit Versailles is right before Ascension day -- and I was going to be at Chartres Cathedral ON Ascension day !

Can you please give me some feedback as to what the crowds might be like ?

Versailles will be a Wednesday and Chartres a Thursday/Friday...

I wasn't sure if because this is a religious 4 day holiday weekend, that the French would go to visit these sites even more so than usual -- or if that's not the type of thing they would want to do on their holidays...

School will be back in session May 3rd 2010 for all the children in the three districts, from what I can gather...

I'm just worried (Ascension Day) would be like going to Disneyland on July 4th...

Please help ! Thank you so much :)

And Merry upcoming Christmas to you.

Harriet said...

Love the comment left by Belle de Ville. Made me laugh.

I will be interested to hear replies to Loving Annie's question. My experience in Paris on religious weekends is that many things close down, including restaurants.

Is this what you mean with the word "relooking": Je doit relook ma maison.

Anne said...

Loving Annie: Yes, it will be a big holiday weekend and yes, Versailles will be crowded but then it's always crowded. My best advice: get there first thing in the morning so you're out of the chateau before the worst of the crowds. You can book your tickets in advance and print them out on-line so that's one line you can skip. You can spend the latter part of the day in the gardens and they are so big that you won't have a hard time escaping people.

As for Chartres on Ascension Day, I'm not sure. The French are really not big church goers so I don't know that they'd be making a pilgrimage there on that day. But the best thing to do is to check in advance as to the mass schedule etcetera. But obviously, you're going to have to wait until closer to the date for that.

May is riddled with holidays and I find the pattern of what's open and what's closed to be somewhat peripatetic. At least it's not New Year's!

As for the school holidays, just be aware that Paris is one of the world's top tourist destinations. It's always a school vacation for someone and there are always busloads of tourists everywhere. So take a deep breath and enjoy!

Harriet: I've usually seen "relooking" as a noun, not as a verb but I wouldn't put it by someone to use it as one.

Virginia said...

I think if you have too much vin with your "brunch" you end up calling it "slunch". It looks like Je instead of Le to moi aussi, but mon français is awful so I shouldn't even be commenting!

Loving Annie said...

Thank you, I appreciate the advice.

Really looking forward to visiting next Spring - the last time I went was 30 years ago, and I barely remember it. I think now I will really be delighted with everything.

May try to take some French lessons before I go, so I can at least say good morning and how are you and please and thank you :)

There is a new hotel in Barbizon near Fountainebleu called Hotel Les Pleiades that looked wonderful on the web.
Also a B&B run by Americans in Amboise called LeViuex Manoir that looked pretty too while seeing Chambord & Cheverny & Chenenceaux & Villandry & Azay-Le-Rideau:)

It sounds like you're doing a very nice thing with your Christmas cards !

Harriet said...

To Loving Annie: We enjoyed seeing Leonardo da Vinci's home in Amboise (as well as all the chateaux in the region that you mention). Models of his many inventions are there as well.

Adam said...

I'm not sure what all that is, but it's very cheap! Where did they get the 'e' from for 'brunche' anyway? The Slunche definitely comes from the 'salé' elements but it's a bizarre concoction. Perhaps it was to celebrate the recent 'fooding' festival!

Cécile Qd9 said...

il faut prononcer "rrreuloukin"

Allison said...

Huh hi ! I'm french and your blog's cool !!! Very interesting to see how france and paris is seen by a foreigner (you say foreigner for people from outside a country right? I'm not sure) And concerning your post , and to answer Adam , the "e" at brunch is the mark of present tense for first person "je" , yeah that means brunch here is used as a verb! And for the slunch (I've been living in Paris for now 5years) I'VE NEVER SEEN that kind of word , it's totally crazy to find that a foreigner can find such "new" (weird?) words and I , the good frenchie never seen it before !
And the cansalade is a huh how can I translate it? well it's not a candy salad that's for sure , (but it sounds sweet ) , the dictionnary tells me it's "delicatessen" or "cooked pork meats" and the french for "delicatessen" is charcuterie but here cansalade is the delicatessen from Toulouse (a city from south-west of France) tadaaaa!!!
So instead of saying charcuterie they said cansalade ! :) Anyway I'm going to put your blog in my bookmarks! I love it! see ya!

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